ANESTHESIA FAQs

Are there different types of anesthesia?

Yes. There are many types of anesthesia and each may have many different forms and applications.

Local Anesthesia
An anesthetic drug is usually injected into the tissue to numb the specific location of your body that requires minor surgery.

Regional Anesthesia
An injection is made near a cluster of nerves to numb the portion or region of your body that requires surgery. The most common types of regional anesthesia are spinal and epidural, in which injections are made into areas of the back with great precision. Regional anesthesia can also be used to reduce post-procedure pain. When a regional anesthetic is given you may be awake or provided a sedative, however you will not see or feel the actual surgery.

Sedation 
The administration of sedative drugs to reduce the relieves anxiety and pain of a medical or diagnostic procedure. Under moderate or deep sedation you may fall asleep, but you will wake up easily to respond to people in the room and may be able to respond to verbal cues.

General Anesthesia
The anesthesia provider administers medication to render you unconscious using anesthetic drugs like gases and vapors inhaled through a breathing mask or tube and medications introduced through a vein. Throughout anesthesia, your anesthesia provider will carefully monitor and control your major bodily functions. Routinely, a breathing tube is inserted through your mouth and frequently into the windpipe to maintain proper airway functions during this period. The anesthesia provider will continuously monitor and adjust the length and level of anesthesia as needed throughout the procedure. After surgery your provider will reverse the process so you slowly regain consciousness in the postoperative recovery area.

What are the risks of anesthesia?

All procedures and all types of anesthesia carry some risks. Most will depend on outside factors such as the type of surgery and your current medical condition. While adverse events may occur they are rare. Anesthesia providers take many precautions to minimize these risks and prevent adverse events. Your provider will review the risks with you prior to surgery and you will have an opportunity to discuss the risks that apply to your anesthesia with your anesthesia provider.

Can I take my medication prior to surgery?

It is important to disclose all medications you are currently taking (both prescription and over the counter) or bring a list with you the day of surgery. Some medications may or may not be taken the day of surgery, please discuss this with your surgeon or primary care provider prior to surgery to determine what medications can be taken.

Patients who are taking prescribed narcotics should continue with their dose of medication the day of surgery with a small sip of water up to the time of admission to the facility. Patients who use Duragesic Patches should wear their patch in an area that is away from the site of surgery.

 

Can I eat or drink before surgery?

Fasting Guidelines for Elective Surgery (Pediatric & Adult):
· 2 Hours for Clear Liquids (e.g. water, juices without pulp, carbonated beverages, black coffee without cream, and these liquids should not include alcohol)
· 4 Hours for Breast Milk
· 6 Hours for Light Meal (typically consists of toast and clear liquids or infant formula)
· 8 Hours for Normal Meal* (e.g. dairy, orange juice, fried or fatty foods, meats, nuts, gastric tube feeds)

The fasting periods noted above apply to patients aged greater than 1. Parents should contact the facility for specific guidelines if the child is under one (1) year of age. Some facilities may instruct you not to take anything after midnight, please follow their instructions. If you have any specific questions regarding fasting guidelines please contact the facility where you surgery is scheduled or your surgeon’s office.
**FCAA encourages light, low fat meals. Both the amount and type of food ingested must be considered when determining the appropriate fasting period.

Can I smoke before surgery?

There is some evidence that suggests a brief abstinence from cigarette smoking (e.g., abstaining from smoking on the morning of surgery) can dramatically reduce both nicotine and carbon monoxide levels and reduce risks for some perioperative complications.

FCAA encourages all patients to abstain from cigarette smoking after midnight (12:00 AM) on the day of surgery.

How is an Epidural performed?

Once your requesting provider is ready to proceed with an epidural, your doctor or anesthesia provider will place the epidural block in your lower back while you are either sitting up or lying on your side. First, the anesthesia provider will use a local anesthetic to numb your back. He or she will then place a special needle to access epidural space and a tiny catheter will be inserted through the needle into the back to deliver the anesthetic and the needle will be removed.

Who will be providing my anesthesia care?

CRNAs receive additional specialized training that qualifies them to provide anesthesia services under the supervision of a with a board certified anesthesiologist.

How can I minimize any nausea and vomiting after surgery?

Patients sometimes experience drowsiness and minor after-affects following anesthesia such as muscle aches, sore throat, dizziness or headaches. Some experience nausea, and occasionally vomiting. These side effects are nothing to be alarmed about, and they usually go away quickly. However, be sure to let your anesthesia provider know in advance if you have previously experienced these symptoms, and they may be able to prescribe different kinds of medications to prevent these symptoms from occurring.

Where will I go after outpatient surgery?

After the procedure you or your child may be taken by the anesthesia care team to the PACU or “recovery room”. Here the PACU care team will treat any side effects of surgery and anesthesia that you or your child may experience including pain and nausea. Once the PACU team has decided you are ready to be safely discharged, you or your child will be allowed to go home.

Will I be able to drive myself home?

While you can be safely discharged from a surgery center or hospital after you have undergone an outpatient procedure, you must make arrangements for a responsible adult to take you home after your surgery. You are strongly encouraged to make arrangements for someone to stay with you during the first 24 hours after your surgery while you are completing your recovery.

Why am I receiving phone calls and/or emails about my anesthesia experience?

FCAA is dedicated to delivering the best experience possible for our patients. One way we track our progress in ensuring YOUR Safety and Comfort is through the use of Survey Vitals, our patient satisfaction survey. You may be contacted via phone or email and asked to answer a series of questions related to your experiences relating to anesthesia. If you would like to opt-out of the survey please contact us at 888-276-1910.

What if I am feeling cold symptoms prior to surgery?

It is important to disclose all medications you are currently taking (both prescription and over the counter) or bring a list with you the day of surgery. Some medications may or may not be taken the day of surgery, please discuss this with your surgeon or primary care provider prior to surgery to determine what medications can be taken.

Patients who are taking prescribed narcotics should continue with their dose of medication the day of surgery with a small sip of water up to the time of admission to the facility. Patients who use Duragesic Patches should wear their patch in an area that is away from the site of surgery.

 

 

BILLING FAQs

Why did I receive multiple bills for my visit?

FCAA’s anesthesia providers are not employed by the facilities where we provide care. Fees for anesthesia are billed separately. You may receive separate bills from the surgeon, hospital, or surgery center for their fees.

Will I receive a bill from the hospital for Anesthesia?

Hospitals and surgery centers often include in their bill any supplies, equipment and medications relating to anesthesia, but not anesthesia services.

Does FCAA accept my insurance?

FCAA currently participates with a majority of the area’s major insurance carriers, including many smaller insurance providers. If you do not see your insurance provider below, please contact our billing partner, abeo, at 888-276-1910 to see if we accept your carrier.

Participating insurance carriers:

    • Adventist HealthNet
    • Aetna
    • Carefirst
    • Cigna
    • Johns Hopkins Health Plan
    • Kaiser Permanente
    • Multiplan
    • Tricare
    • OneNet

    • United Healthcare
    • Medicare and Medicaid
Did you bill my insurance?

If you provided your insurance information at the facility where your procedure is performed, FCAA will file a claim with your insurance carrier. Depending on your plan, you may be required to pay a portion of the bill as a result of your plan’s deductible, co-insurance and/or co-pay. For specific details on your obligations, please contact your insurance carrier.

How can I pay my bill?

FCAA accepts payment by personal check, MasterCard, VISA, Discover, and AMEX. When paying by personal check, please make checks payable to First Colonies Anesthesia Associates LLC and include the bottom portion of your statement when mailing. To pay your bill online by credit card, click here. To pay your bill by phone or discuss other payment options, please call our billing partner, abeo, at 888-276-1910.

Is it possible to get an estimated cost?

Yes, please call our billing partner abeo at 888-276-1910. To ensure we are able to provide you an accurate estimate, be prepared to provide them with the surgical procedure’s CPT code and the surgeon’s estimated length of time for the surgery. Please note this is an estimate only. The actual cost of the surgery could vary and is based on the time of surgery, health status, and final procedure performed.

What if I do not have insurance?

FCAA offers payment alternatives for those individuals that may be uninsured or unable to pay due to financial hardships. Please contact our billing partner, abeo, at 888-276-1910 to discuss payment options, should you be unable to pay your bill in full.

PATIENT FORMS


First Colonies Anesthesia Associates, (FCAA) takes matters of patient privacy very seriously. FCAA follows HIPAA Privacy and Security Regulations closely to ensure patient medical information is protected. Our anesthesiologistsCRNAs and supporting staff receive HIPAA training and notifications annually and as new regulations are released.  Below are our Notice of Privacy Practices for your review and our Anesthesia Consent Form. Contact our office for more information.


Notice of Privacy Practicesdownload

 Anesthesia Consent Formdownload